Leagues

Soccer Humanoid(Kid)

  • On-site Competition
    The RoboCup Soccer Humanoid (Kid) League is a competition in which humanoid robots (humanoids) developed by each team autonomously play soccer. A team of up to 4 robots will play soccer in cooperation with each other.
    Advanced control is required, such as bipedal walking on artificial turf, shooting, and getting up. In addition, since robots use an ordinary soccer ball that is difficult to detect in games, it is also a difficult task to detect the balls. It is also necessary to recognize the surrounding environment with cameras on the head and estimate its position.
    Researchers from all over the world are competing and cooperating to develop robots so that they can beat the human champion team in 2050.

    Virtual Competition
    Virtual Competition will not be held at the RCAP 2021.

Soccer Standard Platform

  • On-site Competition
    On-site Competition will not be held at the RCAP 2021.

    Virtual Competition
    TBD

Soccer Middle Size

  • On-site Competition
    On-site Competition will not be held at the RCAP 2021.

    Virtual Competition
    TBD

Soccer Small Size

  • On-site Competition
    At on-site competition of the Soccer Small Size League, two teams compete in a soccer match using 11 small-size mobile robots per each team. The cylindrical robots of 18 cm in diameter and 15 cm in height can move smoothly in all directions and can use two different types of kicks. The position information of the robots and the ball is provided in real time by cameras overlooking the field and an image processing server. The information is used by an artificial intelligence (AI) software of each team to determine the team's strategy and motion control commands for the robots.
    This league is one of the oldest one since RoboCup began, and focuses on problems related to cooperation and control of multiple robots (agents) in a dynamic environment. The progress of the game, refereeing, and even the placement of the ball off the field is automated by the software and robots. Among the soccer leagues, the game is characterized by the most fast-pace progress.
    The rules of the game will be basically the same as those of RoboCup 2021, but some changes may be made for this tournament.

    Virtual Competition
    At virual competition of the small soccer league, each team competes by evaluating the basic skill performance of one or more *actual* small-size mobile robots. There are four types of evaluation aspects: scoring (for two types of situation settings), dribbling, and successively passing.

Soccer Simulation(2D)

  • On-site Competition
    The RoboCup Soccer Simulation (2D) League is a competition in which 11 against 11 players play soccer on a virtual field on a computer according to almost the same rules as humans.Since it is a pure software competition that does not use hardware, the superiority or inferiority of the artificial intelligence program determines the outcome.
    At first glance, it looks like a video game, but it differs greatly from video games since each player autonomously plays in the virtual space.Players have virtual sensors, each of which recognizes the world around them independently. In addition, players cannot directly know what the other players are thinking, and can communicate only with conversation through a limited communication path in the virtual space.
    After introducing such complexity that imitates the real world, participants develop an artificial intelligence program that makes decisions to realize teamwork.

    Virtual Competition
    Same as the On-site competition

Rescue Simulation(Agent)

  • On-site Competition
    The RoboCup Rescue Simulation (Agent) League is a competition in which rescue teams, fire brigades, and road patrol teams called agents are introduced in a simulator to search for and rescue people in need of rescue, such as citizens, on the assumption that a large-scale disaster has occurred in an urban area created in a computer.
    At RCAP2021 Aich Japan, we will focus on searching for people in need of rescue, rescuing them with the cooperation of multiple agents, and transporting them to appropriate relief facilities. Since agents do not have a panoramic view of the entire city, various problems should be solved simultaneously with artificial intelligence, such as how to work together to explore the entire city, in what order to clear roads closed due to collapsed buildings, etc., and how to rescue people in need of rescue while considering the number of empty beds in the relief facilities.
    Pay attention to how each participant has agents to perform disaster relief activities while communication between agents is not ensured.

    Virtual Competition
    Same as the On-site competition

Rescue Robot

  • On-site Competition
    The RoboCup Rescue Robot League is a competition to evaluate various performance capabilities of robots (rescue robots) that collect information and work on behalf of humans at dangerous disaster sites. Participants will compete on the overall ability of the robots of each team. Robots perform various tasks, demonstrating maneuvering ability to move the robot as desired, mobility to run on uneven terrain and stairs, dexterity to perform delicate and powerful work using a manipulator, and exploration ability to map the exploration environment and recognize objects.

    Virtual Competition
    We evaluate various performance capabilities of robots (rescue robots) that collect information and work on behalf of humans at dangerous disaster sites, and present the Best-In-Class award for each performance. Participating teams will carry out the tasks indicated by the competition committee members in advance and submit a video of the tasks. The competition committee will evaluate the videos and decide the winning team.

@Home Open Platform

  • On-site Competition
    The RoboCup@Home (At Home) League is a competition to see how well robots can perform tasks helpfully live with humans in a home environment such as a living room or kitchen, assuming that robots are used in daily life. Manipulation techniques such as opening and closing doors and grabbing objects are essential. There is also an emphasis on tracking humans and natural communication between robots and humans. Voice interaction technology and image recognition technology are also required.
    In the RoboCup@Home League, the "Open Platform League" (OPL) is a category in which participants compete with their robots.

    Virtual Competition
    Same as the On-site competition

@Home Domestic Standard Platform

  • On-site Competition
    The RoboCup@Home (At Home) League is a competition to see how well robots can perform tasks helpfully live with humans in a home environment such as a living room or kitchen, assuming that robots are used in daily life. Manipulation techniques such as opening and closing doors and grabbing objects are essential. There is also an emphasis on tracking humans and natural communication between robots and humans. Voice interaction technology and image recognition technology are also required.
    In the RoboCup@Home League, the Domestic Standard Platform League (DSPL) is competed using Toyota's HSR robots.

    Virtual Competition
    Same as the On-site competition

@Home Simulation (OPL)

  • On-site Competition
    The RoboCup @Home(At Home) Simulation Open Platform League (S-OPL) competes in the ability of robots to interact with humans in everyday life spaces and provide assistance in daily life. Although the target of the competition is the same as the Domestic Standard Platform League (DSPL), the main difference is that both the robot's behavior and human interaction are reproduced in a simulation environment, which is a feature of the Simulation Open Platform League (S-OPL). The S-OPL not only evaluates physical movement and object grasping capabilities in a robot simulation but also evaluates the ability to interact with real humans in natural language using the SIGVerse platform, which allows humans to intervene in the robot simulation in real-time. We will use the SIGVerse platform, which allows humans to intervene in real-time in robot simulations, to evaluate the robot's ability to interact with real humans and its ability to interact in natural language. The competition is divided into three tasks: Handyman, which searches for objects; Interactive Cleanup, which transports objects as instructed by the user's pointing gestures; and Human Navigation, which uses natural language to support the user's actions guide them so that they do not get lost.

    Virtual Competition
    Same as the On-site competition

@Home Simulation (DSPL)

  • On-site Competition
    The RoboCup@Home (At Home) League is a competition to see how well robots can perform tasks helpfully live with humans in a home environment such as a living room or kitchen, assuming that robots are used in daily life. In particular, the Simulation DSPL (S-DSPL) is an algorithm competition using a robot simulator that can reproduce real physical phenomena. Participants compete for points in a highly challenging tidy-up task that requires object recognition and advanced grasping techniques.

    Virtual Competition
    Same as the On-site competition

@Home Education

  • On-site Competition
    The RoboCup@Home Education League is an educational competition platform to cultivate beginner teams for RoboCup@Home leagues. The unique Workshop+Competition format effectively boosts novice participants for challenging service robot development and AI learning within an event time. Hosted locally and internationally, by the community, and for the community.

    Virtual Competition
    The RoboCup@Home Education Challenge is an educational competition platform to cultivate beginner teams for RoboCup@Home challenges. The unique Workshop+Competition format effectively boosts novice participants for challenging service robot development and AI learning within an event time. Hosted locally and internationally, by the community, and for the community.

Industrial Logistics

  • On-site Competition
    The RoboCup Logistics League is a competition that is based on logistics and warehouse management systems using mobile industrial robots. With Industry 4.0 in mind, participants will compete in robotics technology for automation, autonomy, and mobility with robots. Industry 4.0 refers to innovation in the manufacturing industry that makes full use of information technology. It is assumed that the manufacturing site is optimized by the collaboration among machines or between machines and humans.
    An increasing number of factories are focusing on flexible line systems that support high-mix low-volume production instead of fixed lines suitable for mass production. Such factories need the ability to transport materials to processing machines in order to produce products. To adapt to such an environment, three robots move around between processing machines and cooperate with each other to aim for efficient production planning and scheduling in the usual world championships.
    In this competition, we will focus on the constituent technologies and in the field of 5 × 5 [m], conduct 1) Navigation Challenge, 2) Exploration Challenge, 3) Grasping Challenge, 4) Product Challenge, 5) Exploration + Production Challenge, and 6) Markerless Detection Challenge.

    Virtual Competition
    Same as the On-site competition
    Each team will take a video of their performance and submit a game log recorded by the referee program to the competition committee.We also plan to conduct the on-site competition in the same way.The competition committee will analyze the logs and confirm the validity of the competition.

Industrial @Work

  • On-site Competition
    On-site competition will not be hed at the RCAP2021.

    Virtual Competition
    The RoboCup @Work League is a competition that is based on logistics and warehouse management systems using mobile industrial robots. With Industry 4.0 in mind, participants will compete in robotics technology for automation and autonomy with mobile robots.Industry 4.0 refers to innovation in the manufacturing industry that makes full use of information technology. It is assumed that the manufacturing site is optimized by the collaboration among machines or between machines and humans.
    In smart factories in Industry 4.0, mobile robots called mobile manipulators equipped with industrial robot arms are thought to support humans. Participants will compete in robotics technology in anticipation of such a future. Robot arms equipped with wheels and other moving mechanisms detects parts, collects them, and transports them to the destination.

*The leagues listed above are tentative and subject to change.

Junior Soccer (Open/Light Weight)

  • On-site Competition
    The RCJ Soccer League is a competitive-type game in which one team uses two robots to score in the opponent’s goal.
    On a special field similar to a real soccer field, robots chase the ball to score a goal. The soccer challenge has two soccer leagues: one is the Soccer Lightweight League in which robots chase a pulse ball (Φ22 cm, 1,100 g or less) that emits infrared rays, and the other is the Soccer Open League in which robots acquire the image data of an orange ball (Φ18cm, 2,200 g or less) by cameras to find and kick the ball.
    Only the members of the team will make and program the autonomous robots.

    Virtual Competition
    The purpose of the Virtual Competition is to evaluate the technology of manufactured robots according to the rules of the junior soccer on-site competition.
    The competition committee members will review posters and videos submitted in advance.
    We plan to conduct an online interview during the competition.

Junior Rescue (Line/Maze)

  • On-site Competition
    The RCJ Rescue League is a competition in which robots find and rescue victims in a situation that simulates an actual disaster. The situation at the disaster site can vary from flat roads to bumpy roads to roads with obstacles to be avoided.
    The competition committee will evaluate the technology of robots made according to the competition rules during the competition with actual machines. In addition, we plan to have participants to submit technical materials in advance and conduct interviews in parallel.

    Virtual Competition
    The competition committee members will evaluate the technology of the robots made according to the on-site competition rules based on the technical materials and videos submitted in advance and interviews.
    We also plan to offer simulation competitions of LINE and MAZE that will be held at this year’s world championships.

Junior Rescue (Simulation)

  • On-site Competition
    The RCJ Rescue Simulation League is a competition to see how efficiently rescue cars can help victims in a disaster area. The map of a simulated disaster area shows various obstacles, victims (triaged), and marks and lines that imitate the rescue area, and a robot makes a smooth round trip to the rescue area in the order of the victims whom the robot wants to rescue to save as many victims as possible. Using the same platform (simulator), each team quickly formulates a strategy from the map with free ideas, combines ingenuity such as algorithms, and competes in optimizing rescue car movements. At the same time, team collaboration is naturally required due to the difficulty of the challenge, and the point is how to utilize the strengths of each member.

    Virtual Competition
    Same as the On-site competition

Junior Onstage

  • On-site Competition
    The RCJ OnStage League is a dance competition that elementary school students can participate in with autonomous robots. The robots perform dances and performances within a two-minute performance time. One of the attractions of the OnStage league is that there are no restrictions on the number or size of robots.
    There are many attractions that other leagues do not have, such as exploring the mechanism of robots and aiming for collaboration between robots and humans in free thinking. The OnStage league has an interview screening and a performance screening in which the robot actually acts. The judges evaluate based on a score sheet and rank them according to the score on the score sheet.
    The screening criteria are divided into six categories: “programming,” “structure and composition,” “use of sensors,” “choreography,” “costumes,” and “entertainment.” In the interview screening, “programming,” “structure and composition,” and “use of sensors” are mainly evaluated. In the performance screening, “structure and composition,” “choreography,” “costumes,” and “entertainment” are mainly evaluated.

    Virtual Competition
    For the Virtual Competition, participants will submit technical sheets and demonstration videos in advance. After that, the competition committee will conduct an online interview.
    Performances are streamed online in real time to share reproducibility and tense atmosphere.

*The leagues listed above are tentative and subject to change.

Flying Robot

  • On-site Competition
    In this competition, you will perform a number of tasks using an autonomous flying robot (drone) in a house that has been damaged in a disaster. Fly through windows, search for victims and avoid obstacles in a house with a number of small rooms to reach the goal.

    Virtual Competition
    Commands will be sent from a remote location via the web to the flying robots at the on-site competition venue where they will perform the same tasks as the robots in the on-site competition. Remote competitors will obtain camera images of the flying robots at the on-site competition venue over the Internet, process the images using their own programs, and then send commands online to the flying robots at the on-site competition venue to reach the goal.

CoSpace Autonomous Driving

  • On-site Competition
    The RCAP CoSpace Autonomous Driving Challenge is a line tracing competition in which rescue cars compete to see how quickly they can reach the victims (goals) in a disaster area. Many elementary school students and beginners are participating in the competition overseas, mastering this level and moving to RCAP CoSpace Rescue, further moving to RCJ Rescue Simulation, and further stepping up to the international competition of RCJ Rescue Simulation. An effective step-by-step approach is utilized in this well-thought-out educational program.

    Virtual Competition
    TBD

CoSpace Rescue

  • On-site Competition
    The RCAP CoSpace Rescue League is a competition to see how efficiently rescue cars can help victims in a disaster area. The map of a simulated disaster area shows various obstacles, victims (triaged), and marks and lines that imitate the rescue area, and a robot makes a smooth round trip to the rescue area in the order of the victims whom the robot wants to rescue to save as many victims as possible. Using the same platform (simulator), each team quickly formulates a strategy from the map with free ideas, adjusts the rescue car, and sophisticates the movement.
    Since RCAP CoSpace Rescue is easier than Rescue Simulation, even elementary school students are participating overseas in large numbers.

    Virtual Competition
    TBD

*The leagues listed above are tentative and subject to change.